A historic experiment in medical marijuana research spanning a dozen years, which brought new science to the debate on the place of cannabis in medicine, has found that the herb offers broad benefits for pain control from injuries, HIV, strokes and other conditions.

The Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research — established and funded to the tune of $8.7 million by the California Legislature to answer the question of whether marijuana has any therapeutic value — has now all but completed the most comprehensive studies into pot’s effectiveness ever conducted in the United States, reported Peter Hecht in 2012 at the Sacramento Bee.

State-commissioned clinical trials involving more than 300 patients have been finished; the final data are being analyzed for medical journals.

Dr. Igor Grant, Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research:

“Every one of the studies showed a benefit”

[Kenny Goldberg/KPBS]

After seven completed clinical trials between 2002 and 2012, with five studies already published and two more pending, the scientists say their research shows marijuana does, in fact, have therapeutic value.

“Every one of the studies showed a benefit,” said Dr. Igor Grant, a neuropsychiatrist who served as director of the Center. “The convergence of evidence makes me convinced there is a medical benefit here, and there may be a niche for cannabis.”

According to Grant, the research suggests that the American government’s treatment of marijuana as having no medical use “is completely at odds with the existing science.”

“It is intellectually dishonest to say it has no value whatsoever, because it’s just not true,” Grant said.

via Toke Signals with Steve Elliott | Studies Spanning 12 Years: Medical Cannabis Works.